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Student in a research lab
Marine science out in the field
Students developing photography

Turn Your Ideas Into Reality
Research opportunities at The University of Tampa allow students to make important contributions to their fields while delving into subjects about which they are passionate.

Develop Key Skills
Students who are involved in research develop outstanding critical thinking skills, become better communicators and learn to work collaboratively. These are all important skills sought by employers and graduate schools.

Student Research Stories (Click the photos below to learn more.)


Gaston Merideth II

Gaston Merideth II ’18 has been working since his first year at UT with Kenyon Evans-Nguyen, associate professor of chemistry, on finding ways to analyze forensic evidence quickly while in the field.

Forensic Science Research

Jessica Elson

Jessica Elson ’20 has been involved in paradigm shifting research studying seahorse ecology in the Bahamas.

Seahorse Research

Nichole Laggan

Nichole Laggan ’18 studied a fungus that is contributing to the extinction of frogs. She presented her research at the Annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America.

Frog Research

Mackenzie Harrington

Mackenzie Harrington ’19 presents her research on gender differences in Spanish language learning at the Florida Undergraduate Research Conference.

Battle of the Sexes Research

Jason Behnke

Jason Behnke '19 presents his research on college student happiness at the Florida Collegiate Honors Council.

Collegiate Happiness Research

Devon Grey

The University of Tampa creates a strong connection between students and faculty, allowing students the ability to gain hands-on research experience starting their first year. Undergraduates are given both the freedom and support to follow their interests and take the lead on their own research projects. This allows students to foster several important skills, such as creative thinking, time management, teamwork and problem solving, all of which are vital for their future careers.”

— Devon Grey ’20, B.S. in Molecular Biology, current Ph.D. student at The University of Alabama at Birmingham