LEED Certifications

UT is committed to conserving energy and resources throughout campus, and in September 2011 received LEED® Gold certification from U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) for its Science Annex, and LEED Silver certification for its Dickey Health and Wellness Center.

What is LEED Certification?

Developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification is an internationally recognized green building certification system that provides building owners and operators a concise framework for identifying and implementing practical and measurable green building design, construction, operations and maintenance solutions.

Efforts and tools are aimed at improving performance across all the metrics that matter most to a building and its occupants: energy savings, water efficiency, CO2 emissions reduction, improved indoor environmental quality, and stewardship of resources and sensitivity to their impacts.

DHWC_LeedThe Dickey Health and Wellness Center, which opened in November 2010, provides health and wellness services to UT undergraduate students. The building’s design and construction teams adhered to the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Certification guidelines to make the building a healthier, more efficient and sustainable building for the occupants and visitors of the building.

Sustainability Features of the Dickey Health and Wellness Center: 
  • Silver LEED Certification
    Recycling During Construction and Normal Operations – The project team worked to reduce the amount of waste leaving the site during construction by recycling many of the recyclable waste materials such as wood, metal, concrete, drywall, plastics and cardboard.
  • Low VOC Finishes – All finishes—paints, coatings, sealants, adhesives and woods—inside the building meet strict guidelines set forth by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, significantly improving the indoor air environment and health for all occupants.
  • Lighting Controls – Most interior spaces, including examination rooms, restrooms and offices, use occupancy sensors that will only turn on lights when the room is being used, and automatically turn off when the room has been vacated.
  • Individual Temperature Controls – Most offices in the building employ temperature controls to allow for occupants to control their thermal comfort individually, rather than requiring the entire building to be set at a lower temperature, significantly improving energy efficiency.
  • Low Flow Faucets and Fixtures – The building’s restrooms are fitted with low flow fixtures, including low flow faucets and toilets, significantly reducing water consumption in the building and reducing water demand by over 30 percent.
  • Locally Sourced/Recycled Materials – During construction, the design and build team reviewed all materials and sourced as many local/regional materials with recycled content as possible, reducing CO2 emissions from travel and reducing the need for virgin materials.

Science AnnexThe Science Annex, completed in August 2010, employed strategies during design and construction that would help the project be more efficient, sustainable and healthy.

Sustainability Features of the Science Annex:
  • Recycling During Construction and Normal Operations – The project team worked to reduce the amount of waste leaving the site during construction by recycling many of the recyclable waste materials such as wood, metal, concrete, drywall, plastics and cardboard.
  • Low Flow Faucets and Fixtures – The building’s restrooms are fitted with low flow fixtures, including low flow faucets and toilets, significantly reducing water consumption in the building and reducing water demand by over 30 percent.
  • Building Monitoring – All mechanical systems including the HVAC system, lighting and water distribution system have monitors that allow UT to review the consumption of energy and Gold LEED Certificationresources daily, which will help monitor the building’s operations and ensure continued efficiency.
  • Reflective Surfaces – The Science Annex is fitted with a highly reflective roof covering that reflects the sun’s heat, helping create a more comfortable indoor environment while reducing the energy required to cool the building.
  • Locally Sourced/Recycled Materials – During construction, the design and build team reviewed all materials and sourced as many local/regional materials with recycled content as possible, reducing CO2 emissions from travel and reducing the need for virgin materials.
  • Lighting Controls – Most interior spaces, including restrooms and storage areas, use occupancy sensors that will only turn on lights when the room is being used, and automatically turn off when the room has been vacated.
  • Energy Recovery Unit – An energy recovery unit recycles the energy used to exhaust the space by capturing the cool air leaving the return air vents, and using it to cool the fresh air entering the building through the HVAC system.
  • Bike Racks/Changing Rooms – Occupants of the building can make use of the bike racks provided at the building entrance, as well as showers and changing rooms in the adjacent Cass Science building.
  • Low VOC Finishes – All finishes—paints, coatings, sealants, adhesives and woods—inside the building meet strict guidelines set forth by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, significantly improving the indoor air environment and health for all occupants.