Honors Program Courses

Fall 2014

ACCH202 T (4)—FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING INFO
Prof. D. Verreault
F 8:30 - 11:50 AM

Studies external financial reporting of enterprises. Examines the creation, flow and analysis of enterprise financial information including income statement, balance sheet and statement of retained earnings in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Students conduct introductory Internet research on published company financial information. Significant use of electronic data retrieval and spreadsheet applications is required.

ARTH101 D (4)—Form and Idea (W)(IG)(A)
Prof. J. King
TR 10:00-11:50 AM

The purpose of this honors course is to provide you with an opportunity to increase your knowledge and understanding of how the arts, in the broad context, and the visual arts in particular serve mankind: why they are created, how various cultures have employed them, how they are constructed, how they affect us and the value they have for enriching our lives. You will have opportunities for gallery and museum visitation as well as opportunities to discuss visual aesthetics and contemporary art. An important aspect of this Honors course will be the opportunity to actually experience relevant studio media by working with ceramics, stone, painting and creating a relief print.
AWRH201 C (4)----Writing and Research Honors
Prof. R. Mathews
MWF 10:00-11:10 AM
Writing and Research asks students to conduct academic research as the foundation for their own arguments. Students will learn to evaluate, incorporate and document sources. AWR 201 seeks to strengthen students’ awareness of ethical concerns in writing and research. May not count for the English or writing major or minor.
  
BIOH203 E1 (4)—Biological Diversity (Must take with BIOH203L D or E1)
Prof. T. McMahon
MW 11:30AM - 12:50 PM

Examines the diversity in the plant and animal phyla, emphasizing taxonomy, ecology, behavior, evolution and reproduction. Must be completed with a grade of "C" or better to count toward biology lower core requirements.

BIOH203L D1 (0)—BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY LAB-H (Must take with BIOH203 E1)
Prof. T. McMahon
T 11:00AM - 1:50 PM

Examines the diversity in the plant and animal phyla, emphasizing taxonomy, ecology, behavior, evolution and reproduction. Must be completed with a grade of "C" or better to count toward biology lower core requirements.

BIOH203L E1 (0)—BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY LAB-H (Must take with BIOH203 E1)
Prof. T. McMahon
F 11:30AM - 2:20 PM

Examines the diversity in the plant and animal phyla, emphasizing taxonomy, ecology, behavior, evolution and reproduction. Must be completed with a grade of "C" or better to count toward biology lower core requirements.

BIOH204 J1 (4)—BIOLOGICAL UNITY-HONORS (Must be taken with BIOH204L D1 or E1; Pre-Req or concurrent: CHE 152 and 153L)
Prof. E. Freundt
MW 4:00 - 5:20 PM

Examines the diversity in the plant and animal phyla, emphasizing taxonomy, ecology, behavior, evolution and reproduction. Must be completed with a grade of "C" or better to count toward biology lower core requirements.

BIOH204L D1 (0)—Biological Unity Lab (Must take with BIOH204 J1)
Prof. P. Mahadevan
R 11:00AM - 1:50 PM

A study of cellular biology, emphasizing cell structure, metabolism, control mechanisms and genetic systems of plants and animals. Must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward biology lower core requirements.

BIOH204L E1 (0)—Biological Unity Lab (Must take with BIOH204 J1)
Prof. P. Mahadevan
F 11:30AM - 2:20 PM

A study of cellular biology, emphasizing cell structure, metabolism, control mechanisms, and genetic systems of plants and animals. Must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward biology lower core requirements.

BUSH101 B (4)—Introduction Global Business
Prof. B. Shirley
TR 8:00-9:50 AM

This course emphasizes global competitiveness by introducing students to the way companies operate and to how they compete with other companies. In addition, students learn about the importance of leadership, ethical behavior and corporate responsibility in becoming successful and sustaining that success. The course examines each of the functional areas in businesses and how they work together to produce the goods and provide the services customers demand.

CHEH152 D (3)—General Chemistry I-HONORS
Prof. E. Werner
TR 10:00-11:20 AM

Expands on the basic concepts of chemistry. Topics include chemical nomenclature, stoichiometric relationships, the chemistry of gases, atomic structure, chemical bonding and molecular geometry.

COMH224 D (4)—Mass Media and Society Honors
Prof. S. Paine
TR 10:00-11:50 AM

This course studies the fundamentals of communication theory to provide a foundation for understanding how the mass media work, how they influence us, how we can analyze them and how we can effectively advocate for change. After completing this course, students should be able to critically parse the content and understand the economics of contemporary mass media. Students should understand the historical development of contemporary mass media, and how present media relate to both past media and new media developments. Students will conduct original research and write up their results in a variety of persuasive genres ranging from scholarly to popular.

In addition, students will be able to conduct and communicate their own, original media research in a variety of modes. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

COMH232 G (4)—Visual Literacy Honors
Prof. T. Cohen
MWF 1:00-2:10 PM

It is one of the great ironies of contemporary existence that we are beset, informed, controlled and constructed by images, yet we receive almost no formal training in understanding and creating visual communication. Visual Literacy addresses this issue through interdisciplinary study of the terminology and theory of visual communication, with special emphasis on the relationship of visuality and cultural practice. Considering ideas from art history, photography, film, mass media and cultural studies, students are asked to analyze visual rhetoric, begin to see critically, articulate meaning and author visual rhetoric of their own. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the major.

COMH390 M (4)—Ethnicity in Film and Lit-HON
Prof. G. Bachman
W 6:00-9:50 PM

This course is an exploration of the concept of "ethnicity" and how it may be expressed through literature and film. By the end of this course the students should be able to be conversant in the following areas of inquiry: what IS ethnicity in America; how to utilize both "stand point" theory and Heuristic Inquiry in film and literary analysis; how to distinguish form from content and how both may be affected by ethnicity in both film and literature; and how to articulate a variety of different modalities of film (documentary, narrative, experimental) and literature (dramatic, long and short forms, poetry).

CRMH246 B (4)—Death Penalty (H) (W)
Prof. S. Brinkley
TR 8:00-9:50 AM

Few topics in America foster more heated debate than the death penalty. However, in the international community America stands alone as the only Western nation to actively utilize this form of punishment. This course will examine the death penalty from an American and an international perspective focusing upon the conflicting positions of abolition v. support and/or reinstatement. We will examine the philosophical rationale for and against the death penalty, its application and the impact that public attitude has on changes in capital punishment. Fulfills social sciences core requirements.

ECOH204 H (4)—Principles of Microeconomics-H
Prof. C. Skipton
TR 2:00-3:50 PM

An economic analysis of the interactions between households, businesses and the government regarding the allocation of goods, services and resources. Topics include the theory of consumer behavior, production and cost determination, resource pricing, the gains from trade, protectionism and tariffs, competition and monopoly. At least one current antitrust case will be analyzed. Fulfills social sciences core requirements. Prerequisite: MAT 150 or higher.

FYWH101 C (4)—Writing and Inquiry (HONORS)
Prof. A. Whiteside
MWF 10:00-11:10 AM

Invites students to explore questions and think of themselves as writers, constructing answers rhetorically in academic and community contexts.

FYWH101 E (4)—Writing and Inquiry (HONORS)
Prof. A. Whiteside
MWF 11:30-12:40 AM

Invites students to explore questions and think of themselves as writers, constructing answers rhetorically in academic and community contexts.

GWAH100 B (4)—Intro Govt/World Affairs-HONORS
Prof. M. Anderson
TR 8:00-9:50 AM

Covers the essential elements of government and world affairs from a national and international perspective. Fulfills Social Sciences core requirements.

GWAH212 K (2)—Decision Making in the U.N.-HONR
Prof. D. Rey and Prof. L. Coleman
M 6:00-9:50 PM [Second 7-weeks]

Preparation for Harvard Model UN.

HISH102 G (4)—World History to 1500 Honors
Prof. E. Littell-Lamb
MWF 1:00-2:10 PM

This course is a descriptive and analytical survey of world cultures from early river valley civilizations to 14th century, with an equal emphasis on civilizations in Asia, Africa, the Americas, Europe and the Middle East. Among the themes explored are the evolution of social inequalities in early societies, the importance of land and water trade routes as conveyors of civilizations, the influence of nomadic peoples on the spread of ideas and technologies, the reshaping of local cultures as Buddhism and Islam spread to Asia and Africa, and the importance of urban centers such as Alexandra, Baghdad and Chang’an (China) as intellectual and cosmopolitan capitals before the “rise” of the West. Fulfills Social Sciences core requirements.

HISH270 M (4)—Hitler and Stalin-H
Prof. T. Parssinen
W 6:00-9:50 PM

This course will weave together the biographies of the two most important revolutionaries of the twentieth century with an examination of the societies they sought to create. We will try to understand what motivated Hitler and Stalin, how they seized and held power, and how they tried to impose their wills on Europe and the world.

HISH292 H (4)—Periclean Athens/Eliz London-HON
Prof. T. Parssinen
TR 2:00-3:50 PM

Drama flourished in Periclean Athens and Elizabethan London during sustained periods of dynamic political leadership, economic prosperity and social growth. In both cases, drama evolved from longstanding public religious traditions—the ancient Greek revels in honor of Dionysius and the Christian medieval miracle and morality plays. Analogous themes emerge in the plays of these two periods: the power of Fate/God/gods and the limits of human aspiration; the nature of kingship; the roots of social and political corruption; and the role of women. This course will present the historical context for the drama of Periclean Athens and Elizabethan London and explore four masterworks from each period. Selected video versions of the plays will be shown.

LITH271 I (4)—Topics in English Honors: Chinese Literature (W)
Prof. D. Dooghan
MWF 2:30-3:40 PM

This course will follow the development of modern Chinese literature from its inception in the early twentieth century to the present. Students will learn about major movements and writers from both the People’s Republic of China and Taiwan. In addition, texts will be placed in their historical and critical contexts to better understand the texts themselves and the world that produced them.

LJAH315 G (4)—Appellate Advocacy (W)
Prof. A. Smith
MWF 1:00-2:10 PM

Using a mock Supreme Court case, developed by the American Collegiate Moot Court Association, students explore constitutional issues, and using the case, develop critical thinking, persuasive writing, public speaking and analytical skills. In teams of two, students compete in a scrimmage, and depending on their scores, may be selected to represent the University at a regional ACMCA tournament. Individually, students write an appellate brief, crafting arguments for either the mock petitioner or respondent. Course meets first seven weeks.

MGTH330 F (4)—Principles of Management-H
Prof. S. Steiner
TR 12:00-1:50 PM

This course studies the evolution and practice of the core management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. A strong emphasis on leadership skills is integrated into the course content to provide the student a framework to translate classroom theory and practice into individual and team performance in the accomplishment of organizational objectives. Prerequisites: FYW 101, FYW 102 and minimum GPA of 2.25 in 22 credits (6 of 8 Lower Core).

PSYH200 C (4)—General Psychology-H
Prof. S. Hekkanen
MWF 10:00-11:10 AM

An introduction to the basic principles of psychology. Fulfills social sciences core requirements.

QMBH210 F (4)—Managerial Statistics I-HONORS
Prof. R. Papp
TR 12:00-1:50 PM

An introductory course in business statistics. Topics include sampling techniques, descriptive statistics, probability, random variables and probability distributions, normal distribution, sampling distributions, Interval estimation, one-sample tests and simple linear regression. A statistical software package is used to illustrate all methods and techniques.

SPEH200 F (4)—Oral Communication-HONORS
Prof. C. Gurrie
TR 12:00-1:50 PM

Develops and improves the student's skills in critical thinking, rhetorical composition and delivery by exposure to speech types and situations that emphasize the arts of persuasion, argumentation, debate and problem-analysis. Skills include audience analysis, topic selection, structuring and organizing persuasive appeals and argumentative evidence, syllogistic reasoning, analytical methodologies, word usage, rhetorical flourish, vocal expressiveness, articulation and animation. Fulfills Fine Arts/Humanities core requirements.

THRH330 F (4)—Special Topics in Theatre Honors: Garcia Lorca
Prof. G. Luter
TR 12:00-1:50 PM

Federico García Lorca is regarded as the greatest Spanish playwright and one of Spain’s greatest poets since Spain’s Golden Age (mid-late 16th C.) Lorca’s life, career, poetry and plays, and theories of theatre will be studied. Particular focus will be given to his time as a student in Madrid’s Residencia de Estudiantes, his career as a playwright/actor/director and his work as artistic director of Teatro Universitario la Bararca, the avant-garde theatre company he created and managed. Focus will also be on four of his plays, his three rural tragedies: Bodas de Sangre (Blood Wedding), Yerma, La Casa de Bernarda Alba (The House of Bernarda Alba) and on his final tragicomedy, Doña Rosita la Soltera (Doña Rosita the Spinster). His poetry will be analyzed and performed as Readers’ Theatre.

WRIH250 J (4)—Poetry Writing I Honors (W)
Prof. E. Dawson
MW 4:00-5:50 PM

Poetry I Honors covers the basic techniques of writing imaginative poetry. As the course unfolds, students are introduced to the complex practice of creating, and recreating, the world through words. At the semester’s end, students will have a strong foundation in the craft of writing poetry, (traditional verse and free verse) and an understanding of the importance of close reading several texts, including the work of their classmates.


Learn more about the Honors Program.