Honors Program Courses

FALL 2015

ACCH202 T (4)—FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING INFO
Prof. D. Verreault
F 8:30AM-12:20 PM
Studies external financial reporting of enterprises. Examines the creation, flow and analysis of enterprise financial information including income statement, balance sheet and statement of retained earnings in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Students conduct introductory Internet research on published company financial information. Significant use of electronic data retrieval and spreadsheet applications is required.

ARTH101 F (4)—Form and Idea (W)(IG)(A)
Prof. J. King
TR 12:00-1:50 PM
The purpose of this honors course is to provide you with an opportunity to increase your knowledge and understanding of how the arts, in the broad context, and the visual arts in particular serve mankind: why they are created, how various cultures have employed them, how they are constructed, how they affect us and the value they have for enriching our lives. You will have opportunities for gallery and museum visitation as well as opportunities to discuss visual aesthetics and contemporary art. An important aspect of this Honors course will be the opportunity to actually experience relevant studio media; working with ceramics, stone, painting and creating a relief print.

AWRH201 C (4) WRITING AND RESEARCH-H
TBA
MWF 10:00-11:10 AM
Invites students to explore questions and think of themselves as writers, constructing answers rhetorically in academic and community contexts.

BIOH198 C (4)—GENERAL BIOLOGY I- HONORS (Must be taken with BIO198L E1 or E2; Pre-Req or concurrent: CHE 152 and 153L)
Prof. E. Freundt
MW10:00-11:20 AM
A study of biology, emphasizing cell structure, cell reproduction, cellular and organismal metabolism, cell signaling, immunology, endocrinology and mechanisms and genetic systems of plants and animals. Must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward biology lower-core requirements and to enroll in BIO 199 (General Biology II).

BIO198L E1 (0)—General Biology I Lab-H (Must take with BIOH198 C)
Prof. P. Mahadevan
W 11:30AM-2:20 PM
A study of cellular biology, emphasizing cell structure, metabolism, control mechanisms and genetic systems of plants and animals. Prerequisite: Pre- or corequisites: CHE 152 and CHE 153L. Offered: fall and spring semesters.

BIOH198L E2 (0)—General Biology I Lab-H (Must take with BIOH198 C)
Prof. P. Mahadevan
F 11:30AM-2:20 PM
A study of cellular biology, emphasizing cell structure, metabolism, control mechanisms and genetic systems of plants and animals. Prerequisite: Pre- or corequisites: CHE 152 and CHE 153L. Offered: fall and spring semesters.

BIOH199 E1 (4)—GENERAL BIOLOGY II - HONORS (Must take with BIOH199L A1 or D1)
Prof. R. Waggett
MW 11:30AM-12:50 PM
Examines the diversity of life through investigations of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and evolution of all major prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Basic ecological and evolutionary theory are focal points of the course as these represent the mechanisms through which biological and physiological diversity arises. Must be completed with a grade of “C” or better to count toward biology lower-core requirements.

BIOH199L A1 (0)— GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB-H (Must take with BIOH199 E1)
Prof. R. Waggett
F 8:30AM-11:20 AM
Examines the diversity of life through investigations of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and evolution of all major prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Basic ecological and evolutionary theory are focal points of the course as these represent the mechanisms through which biological diversity arises.

BIOH199L D1 (0)— GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB-H (Must take with BIOH199 E1)
Prof. R. Waggett
T 11:00AM-1:50 PM
Examines the diversity of life through investigations of the taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology and evolution of all major prokaryotic and eukaryotic lineages. Basic ecological and evolutionary theory are focal points of the course as these represent the mechanisms through which biological diversity arises.

BUSH101 A (4)—Introduction Global Business
Prof. B. Shirley
MW 8:00-9:50 AM
This course emphasizes global competitiveness by introducing students to the way companies operate and to how they compete with other companies. In addition, students learn about the importance of leadership, ethical behavior and corporate responsibility in becoming successful and sustaining that success. The course examines each of the functional areas in businesses and how they work together to produce the goods and provide the services that customers demand.

CHEH152 D (3)—General Chemistry I-HONORS
Prof. E. Werner
TR 10:00-11:20 AM
Expands on the basic concepts of chemistry. Topics include chemical nomenclature, stoichiometric relationships, the chemistry of gases, atomic structure, chemical bonding and molecular geometry.

COMH224 D (4)—Mass Media and Society Honors
TBA
TR 10:00-11:50 AM
This course studies the fundamentals of communication theory to provide a foundation for understanding how the mass media work, how they influence us, how we can analyze them and how we can effectively advocate for change. After completing this course, students should be able to critically parse the content and understand the economics of contemporary mass media. Students should understand the historical development of contemporary mass media, and how present media relate to both past media and new media developments. Students will conduct original research and write up their results in a variety of persuasive genres ranging from scholarly to popular. In addition, students will be able to conduct and communicate their own, original media research in a variety of modes. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the social sciences if not used for the major.

COMH232 G (4)—Visual Literacy Honors
Prof. J. Giancola
MW 2:00-3:50 PM
It is one of the great ironies of contemporary existence that we are beset, informed, controlled and constructed by images, yet we receive almost no formal training in understanding and creating visual communication. Visual literacy addresses this issue through interdisciplinary study of the terminology and theory of visual communication, with special emphasis on the relationship of visuality and cultural practice. Considering ideas from art history, photography, film, mass media and cultural studies, students are asked to analyze visual rhetoric, begin to see critically, articulate meaning and author visual rhetoric of their own. May be used to fulfill the general distribution requirements for the humanities if not used for the major.

ECOH204 H (4)—Principles of Microeconomics-H
Prof. C. Skipton
TR 2:00-3:50 PM
An economic analysis of the interactions between households, businesses and the government regarding the allocation of goods, services and resources. Topics include the theory of consumer behavior, production and cost determination, resource pricing, the gains from trade, protectionism and tariffs, competition and monopoly. At least one current antitrust case will be analyzed. Fulfills social sciences core requirements. Prerequisite: MAT 150 or higher.

FYWH101 E (4)—Writing and Inquiry (HONORS)
Prof. A. Whiteside
MWF 11:30 AM-12:40 AM
Invites students to explore questions and think of themselves as writers, constructing answers rhetorically in academic and community contexts.

FYWH101 G (4)—Writing and Inquiry (HONORS)
Prof. A. Whiteside
MWF 1:00-2:10 PM
Invites students to explore questions and think of themselves as writers, constructing answers rhetorically in academic and community contexts.

GWAH100 A (4)—Intro Govt/World Affairs-HONORS
Prof. M. Anderson
MW 8:00-9:50 AM
Covers the essential elements of government and world affairs from a national and international perspective. Fulfills Social Sciences core requirements.

GWAH212 K (2)—Decision Making in the U.N.-HONR
Prof. K. Fridy and Prof. L. Coleman
M 6:00-9:50 PM [Second 7-weeks]
Preparation for Harvard Model UN

HISH102 E (4)—World History to 1500 Honors
Prof. E. Littell-Lamb
MWF 11:30 AM-12:40 PM
This course is a descriptive and analytical survey of world cultures from early river valley civilizations to 14th century, with an equal emphasis on civilizations in Asia, Africa, the Americas, Europe and the Middle East. Among the themes explored are the evolution of social inequalities in early societies, the importance of land and water trade routes as conveyors of civilizations, the influence of nomadic peoples on the spread of ideas and technologies, the reshaping of local cultures as Buddhism and Islam spread to Asia and Africa, and the importance of urban centers such as Alexandra, Baghdad, and Chang’an (China) as intellectual and cosmopolitan capitals before the “rise” of the West. Fulfills Social Sciences core requirements.

HISH265 F (4) Secular and Sacred: Greek and Judeo-Christian Origins of Western Civilization- Honors
Prof. T. Parssinen
TR 12:00-1:50 PM
Western civilization has a dual intellectual heritage: the secular, derived from Greek philosophy and drama, and the sacred, derived from Judeo-Christian religion. This course will introduce honors students to this dual heritage by readings and discussions of seminal texts.
 
HSCH100 F (4) Health Science-(possible Honors section)
Prof. A. Kaczmarek
TR 1:00-1:50 PM
Please check the live schedule at SpartanWeb to see if this course and section has an Honors designation. Course description not yet available.

JOUH101 G (4) INTRO TO JOURNALISM-HONORS
Prof. J. Neely
MWF 1:00-2:10 PM
This course will explore the role and function of journalism, its evolution throughout American history, and the current state of the art, craft and business. The various driving principles and operating practices of print, broadcast and online media, legal issues and ethics of journalism will also be examined, as will its transition in the new media age. Students will also take a critical look at how journalism is depicted in popular culture, and the role and evolution of student media, such as our print and online student newspaper, The Minaret.

JOUH213 J (4) TRAVEL WRITING-HONORS (W)
Prof. K. Ochshorn
MW 4:00-5:50 PM
Travel writing is writing about place. It’s a type of nonfiction capitalizing on senses, memory, new experiences, cultures, and the interaction of people and their environment. It’s also about grabbing your reader with narrative, connecting anecdotes and dialogue, taking your reader to places and into your perceptions. Travel writing often includes description or critique of food, architecture, history, music, politics and nature. It can be about how to find your way in a strange place. But you will not be writing public relations copy designed to sell places to a reader: you will be crafting stories that are not required to be upbeat or glowing. Your writing may be humorous or satirical. Some stories will have your personal take but also incorporate factual information. During the semester I will encourage you to move outside your natural milieu, to explore new worlds, even right here in Tampa, keeping safety in mind. This course emphasizes in-the-field, professional writing. You will learn the techniques of research, interviewing and fact checking. You will learn to edit your own work and to peer review the work of classmates.

LITH202 E (4) WORLD LITERATURE II-HONORS (W)
Prof. D. Dooghan
MWF 11:30 AM-12:40 PM
This course serves as an introduction to the field of literary studies and the practice of literary criticism. It examines major literary movements from the late nineteenth century through the middle of the twentieth. We will investigate how texts and ideas move beyond their countries of origin, with an emphasis on the interaction between imperial powers and colonial subjects. These texts cover a variety of transnational genres, while highlighting the role of local forces in shaping literary development. Thus the course looks at literature as a global phenomenon that is paradoxically a product of local political, economic and cultural discourses. The course will also examine literature’s relationships with other arts such as music, dance and painting. Students will gain a foundational understanding of key terms for literary study, as well as practice in applying them. They will also engage with a broad range of seminal texts that will be useful for further study of literature, culture or history. Additionally, students will cultivate careful analytical skills, developed through the reading of and writing about literature, which will be beneficial to any future course of study. Finally, students will conduct individual research projects that link the course materials to contemporary debates in their respective majors. The goal of these projects is both to show the deep impact of artistic works on fields far beyond the humanities, and to hone student research skills.

LJAH315 H (4)—Appellate Advocacy (W)
Prof. A. Smith
TR 2:00-3:50 PM
Using a mock Supreme Court case, developed by the American Collegiate Moot Court Association (ACMCA), students explore constitutional issues, and using the case, develop critical thinking, persuasive writing, public speaking and analytical skills. In teams of two, students compete in a scrimmage, and depending on their scores, may be selected to represent the University at a regional ACMCA tournament. Individually, students write an appellate brief, crafting arguments for either the mock petitioner or respondent. Course meets first seven weeks.

MGTH330 H (4)—Principles of Management-H (W)
Prof. S. Steiner
TR 2:00-3:50 PM
This course studies the evolution and practice of the core management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling. A strong emphasis on leadership skills is integrated into the course content to provide the student a framework to translate classroom theory and practice into individual and team performance in the accomplishment of organizational objectives. Prerequisites: FYW 101, FYW 102 and minimum GPA of 2.25 in 22 credits (6 of 8 Lower Core).

PSYH200 G (4)—General Psychology-H
Prof. S. Hekkanen
MWF 1:00-2:10 PM
An introduction to the basic principles of psychology. Fulfills social sciences core requirements.
 
QMBH210 B (4)—Managerial Statistics I-HONORS
Prof. V. Jain
TR 8:00-9:50 AM
An introductory course in business statistics. Topics include sampling techniques, descriptive statistics, probability, random variables and probability distributions, normal distribution, sampling distributions, Interval estimation, one-sample tests and simple linear regression. A statistical software package is used to illustrate all methods and techniques.

SOCH100 A (4) Introduction to Sociology (NW) (IG)
Prof. R. Cragun
MWF 8:30-9:40 AM
An introduction to the structure, function and development of human societies. Emphasizes the nature and meaning of culture, socialization, personality, social institutions, social inequality and social change. Fulfills social sciences core requirements.

SPEH200 F (4)—Oral Communication-HONORS
Prof. G. Luter
TR 12:00-1:50 PM
Develops and improves the student's skills in critical thinking, rhetorical composition and delivery by exposure to speech types and situations that emphasize the arts of persuasion, argumentation, debate and problem-analysis. Skills include audience analysis, topic selection, structuring and organizing persuasive appeals and argumentative evidence, syllogistic reasoning, analytical methodologies, word usage, rhetorical flourish, vocal expressiveness, articulation and animation. Fulfills Fine Arts/Humanities core requirements.

SPEH208 J (4) Speech for Business and Professions
Prof. C. Gurrie
MW 4:00-5:50PM
Offers practice in briefings, interviews, problem-solving conferences and communication management. Covers techniques for speaking situations commonly encountered in business and the professions, and also includes formal and informal professional writing assignments.

SPTH251 H (4) Latin American Lit. in English Translation: The Cutting Edge
Prof. J. López
TR 2:00-3:50 PM
No prerequisites. Reading and analysis of literary masterworks from Latin America. Courses and readings are in English.

WRIH250 H (4)—Poetry Writing I Honors (W)
Prof. D. Morrill
TR 2:00-3:50 PM
Poetry I Honors covers the basic techniques of writing imaginative poetry. As the course unfolds, students are introduced to the complex practice of creating, and recreating, the world through words. At the semester’s end, students will have a strong foundation in the craft of writing poetry, (traditional verse and free verse) and an understanding of the importance of close reading several texts, including the work of their classmates.


Learn more about the Honors Program.