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UT’s 27-month, 112-credit program, will admit 48 students once per year and is designed to prepare graduates to provide medical care as part of an intercollaborative, health care team. The curriculum consists of four semesters of classroom training followed by three semesters of clinical rotations. All students enter as a single cohort in the fall semester, complete seven continuous semesters and graduate in December with a Master of Physician Assistant Medicine degree (MPAM).

*Subject to receiving program accreditation. See accreditation page for more information regarding current status.

Course Descriptions and Curriculum Policies

PAM 600 Applied Human Anatomy and Physiology

A course designed to provide knowledge of the structure, form and...

A course designed to provide knowledge of the structure, form and function of the human body through a body system approach. Clinically relevant medical terminology, areas of radiographic imaging, surface anatomy and clinical case correlations are integrated into the course. The student, through utilization of state-of-the-art virtual dissection, will achieve visual-spatial realization of human structure and function. Students will acquire anatomic and physiologic knowledge with clinical application through lecture and small group work.

4 credit hours

PAM 601 Applied Human Anatomy Lab

A course designed to allow students to obtain competency...
A course designed to allow students to obtain competency in the visual-spatial (3D) realization of the human body’s structure and function. Through dissection, the student will develop the kinesthetic skills necessary to competently perform medical procedures. The course will include knowledge regarding compassion, respect and medical professionalism through the interactions with the medical team and human cadaver. Clinically relevant medical terminology, areas of radiographic imaging, surface anatomy and clinical case correlations are integrated into the course. Students will acquire anatomic knowledge with clinical application through cadaveric laboratory experience to include human, synthetic and/or virtual dissection.

2 credit hours

PAM 602 Applied Medical Science

A course designed to provide a foundation in science...

A course designed to provide a foundation in science as applied to clinical medicine. This course will cover the following topics: embryology, the genetic and molecular mechanisms of health and disease, the inflammatory process, and microbiology as applied to disease states. Team-based learning modules highlight clinical correlations and the importance of understanding illness and disease at the molecular level. Instruction will include lecture as well as small group exercises and/or problem/case based learning.

3 credit hours

PAM 610 Physical Diagnosis

A course designed to provide the knowledge necessary...

A course designed to provide the knowledge necessary to obtain and complete the medical history and physical examination through the utilization of therapeutic communication, medical equipment, accurate medical terminology and proper examination techniques. The course will provide instruction on the application of appropriate history and physical examination techniques for adults during an annual well exam. Students will be introduced to other visit types such as emergent, acute and chronic visits. Organizational skills for oral and written presentation of findings will be included. The course will be delivered in lecture and small group format.

3 credit hours

PAM 611 Physical Diagnosis Lab

A course designed to provide training on the skills and competencies...

A course designed to provide training on the skills and competencies necessary to obtain and complete the medical history and physical examination. The course will provide students the opportunity to practice H&P skills, obtain and demonstrate competency in a simulated environment. Students are assessed on the application of history and physical examination techniques for adults during an annual well exam. Students will be introduced to other visit types such as emergent, acute and chronic visits. Organizational skills for oral and written presentation of findings will be practiced and assessed. The course will be delivered in a laboratory format.

4 credit hours

PAM 620 Medical Practice: Professionalism and Ethics

The first in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition...

The first in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition into the medical profession and serves as an introduction to multiple professional practice issues. Topics covered in this course include history of profession, academic honesty, medical professionalism, medical ethics and medical documentation. Instruction will include lecture as well as small group exercises and/or problem case-based learning.

1 credit hour

PAM 630 Clinical Medicine I

A course designed to guide the development of problem-solving skills...

A course designed to guide the development of problem-solving skills of medical decision-making process. It will include an examination of diseases/disorders using a body system approach. Medical knowledge includes the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, management and patient education of diseases/disorders. Emphasis will be on disease processes common to primary care practices. Instruction includes the provision of care in preventive, emergent, acute, chronic, adolescent, adult and elderly populations as it applies to disease processes. Instruction will include lecture, problem/case-based learning and small group work (systems include dermatology, hematology/oncology, infectious diseases, nephrology, genitourinary, psychiatric, neurology and endocrinology).

6 credit hours

PAM 640 Pharmacotherapeutics I

A course designed to guide the student in developing problem solving skills...

A course designed to guide the student in developing problem-solving skills to apply in the medical decision-making process in making therapeutic treatment decisions to include both prescription and over-the-counter medications. Both the pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics of drug classes are covered as well as safe, ethical, therapeutic and legal prescribing practices. This course will follow the same body system approach as the clinical medicine course modules. Instruction will include lecture, problem/case-based learning and/or small group work.

3 credit hours

PAM 670 Medical Diagnostics

A course designed to develop a functional understanding...

A course designed to develop a functional understanding of the appropriate utilization of diagnostic tests common to primary care based medicine. The student will learn to select, order, interpret and apply the results of diagnostic studies in the medical decision making process. Topics include clinical laboratory medicine, radiology, nuclear medicine, EKG, cardiac stress test, ECHO, and pulmonary function test. The utilization of ultrasound to guide procedures as well as a diagnostic tool will be included. The course will include lecture, lab and problem/case-based learning and/or small group work.

3 credit hours

PAM 621 Medical Practice: Communication and Patient Education

The second in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition...

The second in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition into the medical profession and serve as an introduction to multiple professional practice issues. Topics covered in this course include effective interpersonal communication, medical Spanish, basic counseling and patient education. Instruction will include lecture as well as small group exercises and problem or case-based learning.

1 credit hour

PAM 650 Applied Patient Care Skills I

A course designed to allow students to become competent...

A course designed to allow students to become competent in performing a variety of patient care skills. Skills are sequenced to the body systems being covered in the corresponding clinical medicine course to include physical examination, diagnostic, procedural, communication, professionalism and team-based skills. The course will allow students to safely apply the medical decision-making process and learn procedural skills in a simulated environment. This course utilizes the PA simulation center to include high fidelity simulators, task trainers and standardized patient experiences.

4 credit hours

PAM 660 Population, Preventive and Mental Health Medicine

A course designed to explore the value of and barriers...

A course designed to explore the value of and barriers to disease prevention and health promotion, factors that influence personal health decisions, preventive interventions directed at individuals (clinical settings) and populations (community settings), strategies for using population health principles to integrate disease prevention and health promotion into practice. This course will include behavioral health topics related to addiction, death dying, abuse/neglect, stress/injury and sexuality. Topics include public health, global health, complementary/alternative medicine, social determinants of health, wellness, immunizations, preventive screenings, exercise and nutrition. Instruction will include lecture as well as small group exercises and/or problem/case-based learning.

2 credit hours

PAM 631 Clinical Medicine II

A course designed to guide the development of problem solving skills...

A course designed to guide the development of problem-solving skills to apply in the medical decision-making process. It will include an examination of diseases/disorders using a body system approach. Medical knowledge includes the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, management, and patient education of diseases. Emphasis will be on disease processes/disorders common to primary care practices. Instruction includes the provision of care in preventive, emergent, acute, chronic, adolescent, adult and elderly populations as it applies to disease processes. Instruction will include lecture, problem/case-based learning and/or small group work (systems include cardiovascular and pulmonology).

4 credit hours

PAM 641 Pharmacotherapeutics II

A course designed to guide the student in developing problem-solving skills...

A course designed to guide the student in developing problem-solving skills to apply in the medical decision-making process in making therapeutic treatment decisions to include both prescription and over-the-counter medications. Both the pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics of drug classes are covered as well as safe, ethical, therapeutic and legal prescribing practices. This course will follow the same body system approach as the clinical medicine course modules. Instruction will include lecture, problem/case-based learning and/or small group work.

2 credit hours

PAM 622 Medical Practice: Evidence-Based Medicine

The third in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition...

The third in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition into the medical profession and serves as an introduction to multiple professional practice issues. This course will guide the student in developing problem-solving skills to apply to the medical decision-making process. The course will include instruction to prepare students to search, interpret and evaluate medical literature to include its application to individualized patient care. Instruction will include lecture as well as small group exercises and/or problem or case-based learning.

1 credit hour

PAM 661 Community Medicine

A course designed to allow students the opportunity to participate...

A course designed to allow students the opportunity to participate in medical service-based learning in a community setting. Students will gain hands-on experience in history and physical examination and cultural competency skills. Team-based skills will be explored. Experiences will occur in multiple community medical centers that provide free medical care to the indigent, uninsured, homeless, veteran, elderly or immigrant populations.

2 credit hours

PAM 651 Applied Patient Care Skills II

A course designed to allow students to become competent...

A course designed to allow students to become competent in performing a variety of patient care skills. Skills are sequenced to the body systems being covered in the corresponding clinical medicine course to include physical examination, diagnostic, procedural, communication, professionalism and team-based skills. The course will allow students to safely apply the medical decision-making process and learn procedural skills in a simulated environment. This course utilizes the PA simulation center to include high fidelity simulators, task trainers and standardized patient experiences.

4 credit hours

PAM 674 Specialty Medicine I

A course designed to guide students in obtaining medical knowledge...

A course designed to guide students in obtaining medical knowledge and developing problem solving skills to apply in the medical decision-making process and patient care as it applies to trauma, hospital floor medicine, emergency medicine, critical care, intensive care, pain/physical rehabilitation and surgical care. The course will include lecture, problem/case-based learning and/or small group work.

2 credit hours

PAM 632 Clinical Medicine III

A course designed to guide the development of problem-solving skills...

A course designed to guide the development of problem-solving skills to apply in the medical decision-making process. It will include an examination of diseases/disorders using a body system approach. Medical knowledge includes the epidemiology, etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, management and patient education of diseases/disorders. Emphasis will be on disease processes common to primary care practices. Instruction includes the provision of care in preventive, emergent, acute, chronic, adolescent, adult and elderly populations. Instruction will include lecture, problem/case-based learning and/or small group work (systems include gastrointestinal, orthopedics, rheumatology, autoimmune, EENT/oral health, gynecologic, obstetrics and men’s health).

6 credit hours

PAM 642 Pharmacotherapeutics III

A course designed to guide the student in developing problem-solving skills...

A course designed to guide the student in developing problem-solving skills to apply in the medical decision-making process in making therapeutic treatment decisions to include both prescription and over-the-counter medications. Both the pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics of drug classes are covered as well as safe, ethical, therapeutic and legal prescribing practices. This course will follow the same body system approach as the clinical medicine course modules. Instruction will include lecture, problem/case-based learning and/or small group work.

3 credit hours

PAM 675 Specialty Medicine II

A course designed to guide students in obtaining medical knowledge...

A course designed to guide students in obtaining medical knowledge and developing problem solving skills to apply in the medical decision-making process and patient care as it applies to military/disaster medicine, telemedicine, pediatric medicine, parenting, geriatric medicine and occupational/environmental medicine. The course will also provide instruction on the application of appropriate history and physical examination techniques for the following populations: infant, children, adolescents and elderly in the following visit types: annual well exam, focused emergent, acute and chronic. The course will include lecture, problem/case-based learning and/or small group work.

3 credit hours

PAM 652 Applied Patient Care Skills III

A course designed to allow students to become competent...

A course designed to allow students to become competent in performing a variety of patient care skills. Skills are sequenced to the corresponding clinical medicine course to include physical examination, diagnostic, procedural, communication, professionalism and team-based skills. The course will allow students to safely apply the medical decision-making process and learn procedural skills in a simulated environment. This course includes instruction in ACLS and PALS which must be successfully completed to pass the course. Students are assessed on the application of history and physical examination techniques for the following populations: infant, children, adolescents and elderly in the following visit types: annual well exam, focused, emergent, acute and chronic. This course utilizes the PA simulation center to include high fidelity simulators, task trainers and standardized patient experiences. This course includes the didactic summative and clinical orientation instruction.

4 credit hours

PAM 623 Medical Practice: Legal and Regulatory Issues

The fourth in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition...

The fourth in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition into the medical profession and serves as an introduction to multiple professional practice issues. Topics covered in this course include the statutes that govern PA practice, current health care laws, safety and quality improvement in health care, the effects of health policy on PA practice and regulations applied to medical practice. Instruction will include lecture as well as small group exercises and problem/case-based learning.

1 credit hour

PAM 624 Medical Practice: Systems-Based Practice

The fifth in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition...

The fifth in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition into the medical profession and serves as an introduction to multiple professional practice issues. Topics covered include health insurance, transitions of care, health care systems, pay for performance, patient centered medical home and chronic care. Instruction will include lecture as well as self-directed studies and/or small group exercises.

1 credit hour

PAM 710 Physician Assistant Competencies I

A course designed to monitor the second-year PA student's progression...

A course designed to monitor the second-year PA student's progression in obtaining the PA competencies in medical knowledge, interpersonal/communication skills, patient care skills, system-based practice, practice-based learning, professionalism, interprofessional collaboration and personal/professional development. Students will complete practical examinations in a simulated patient encounter that will include the utilization of high fidelity simulators, task trainers and/or standardized patients. Under the guidance of their faculty mentor, students will complete sections of their final capstone project during this course.

2 credit hours

PAM 700 Family Medicine Rotation

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity...

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity to participate in the medical decision-making process while developing the appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities to provide care in the ambulatory outpatient family medicine clinic. The course will deliver education on providing comprehensive evidence-based, gender/age specific individualized care, addressing acute and chronic diseases, health promotion and disease prevention in the context of each patient’s social, economic, cultural and religious background. Students will engage with the interprofessional team and behave as a medical professional with patients, families and other members of the medical team.

4 credit hours

PAM 701 Inpatient Medicine Rotation

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity...

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity to participate in the medical decision-making process while developing the appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities to provide care needed by hospitalized patients. During this rotation students will learn the indications for admission, the care of an admitted patient and the process for transfer of the patient from admitted to discharged. Students will have the opportunity to work as part of the primary team while coordinating with subspecialists and interdisciplinary allied health professionals.

4 credit hours

PAM 702 Pediatric Medicine Rotation

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity...

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity to participate in the medical decision-making process while developing the appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities to provide care in a pediatric medicine practice. The course provides education in comprehensive, evidence-based, gender/age specific individualized care, addressing acute and chronic diseases (sick child), health promotion (well child) and disease prevention in the context of each patient’s social, economic, cultural and religious background. Students will engage with the interprofessional team and behave as a medical professional with patients, families and other members of the medical team.

4 credit hours

PAM 625 Medical Practice: Personal and Professional Development

The sixth in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition...

The sixth in a series of courses designed to aid the student’s transition into the medical profession and serve as an introduction to multiple professional practice issues. Topics covered in this course include personal and professional growth, participation in professional organizations, lifelong learning strategies, participation in the legislative process and interprofessional team principles. Instruction will include lecture as well as self-directed studies and/or small group exercises.

1 credit hour

PAM 711 Physician Assistant Competencies II

A course designed to monitor the second-year PA student's progression...

A course designed to monitor the second-year PA student's progression in obtaining the PA competencies in medical knowledge, interpersonal/communication skills, patient care skills, system-based practice, practice-based learning, professionalism, interprofessional collaboration and personal/professional development. Students will complete practical examinations in a simulated patient encounter that will include the utilization of high fidelity simulators, task trainers and/or standardized patients. Under the guidance of their faculty mentor, students will complete sections of their final capstone project during this course.

2 credit hours

PAM 703 Surgical Medicine Rotation

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity...

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity to participate in the medical decision-making process while developing the appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities to provide care in the surgical medicine practice. The experiences in this rotation will include pre-operative, intra-operative (assisting) and post-operative surgical care. Students will engage with the interprofessional team and behave as a medical professional with patients, families and other members of the medical team.

4 credit hours

PAM 704 Emergency Medicine Rotation

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity...

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity to participate in the medical decision-making process while developing the appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities to provide care in the emergency medicine practice. The rotation will take place in emergency departments. This rotation allows students to establish triage skills, learn to recognize and manage conditions that need immediate attention and prioritize care for conditions that are less urgent. Students will engage with the interprofessional team and behave as a medical professional with patients, families and other members of the medical team.

4 credit hours

PAM 707 Elective Experience I

A supervised clinical practice experience selected by the student...

A supervised clinical practice experience selected by the student designed to give students the opportunity to develop appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities in patient care, knowledge for practice, practice-based learning and improvement, communication, professionalism, interprofessional collaboration, system-based practice and/or professional development. Options for students to achieve this include but are not limited to, additional experience in a required rotation; medical discipline of interest not encountered in the previous rotations; public health service; administration; and health policy. If the selected site does not have an existing affiliation, approval from the clinical education coordinator is required.

3 credit hours

PAM 705 Behavioral Medicine Rotation

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity...

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity to participate in the medical decision-making process while developing the appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities to recognize and provide care for various behavioral/mental health problems. In settings such as in/outpatient behavioral/mental health facilities and multiservice centers students will participate in behavioral/mental health evaluations, observe behavioral/mental therapy/interventions and discuss management plans. Emphasis is on applying skills learned to treatment of behavioral/mental health issues in primary care. Students will engage with the interprofessional team and behave as a medical professional with patients, families and other members of the medical team.

4 credit hours

PAM 706 Women’s Medicine Rotation

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity...

A supervised clinical practice experience designed to give students the opportunity to participate in the medical decision-making process while developing the appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities to provide care in a women’s health medicine practice. Experiences include prenatal care, obstetric/gynecologic health histories, ob/gyn exams, evaluation and management planning. Emphasis is on applying skills learned to the treatment of ob/gyn health issues in primary care in the context of each patient’s social, economic, cultural and religious background. Students will engage with the interprofessional team and behave as a medical professional with patients, families and other members of the medical team.

4 credit hours

PAM 708 Elective Experience II

A supervised clinical practice experience selected by the student...

A supervised clinical practice experience selected by the student designed to give students the opportunity to develop appropriate knowledge, skills and abilities in patient care, knowledge for practice, practice-based learning and improvement, communication, professionalism, interprofessional collaboration, system-based practice and/or professional development. Options for students to achieve this include but are not limited to, additional experience in a required rotation; medical discipline of interest not encountered in the previous rotations; public health service; administration; and health policy. If the selected site does not have an existing affiliation, approval from the clinical education coordinator is required.

3 credit hours

PAM 712 Physician Assistant Competencies III

A course designed to monitor the second-year PA student's progression...

A course designed to monitor the second-year PA student's progression in obtaining the PA competencies in medical knowledge, interpersonal/communication skills, patient care skills, system-based practice, practice-based learning, professionalism, interprofessional collaboration and personal/professional development. Students will complete practical examinations in a simulated patient encounter that will include the utilization of high fidelity simulators, task trainers and/or standardized patients. Under the guidance of their faculty mentor, students will complete sections of their final capstone project during this course.

2 credit hours

PAM 800 Graduation Seminar

A course designed to prepare students for the final transition...

A course designed to prepare students for the final transition from student to medical provider. A summative assessment of physician assistant competencies will be included. The final capstone research project will be presented in this course. Topics covered include certifying examination review, certification process, professional licensure, malpractice, professional career planning, contract negotiations, credentialing process and financial planning. Content will be delivered in lecture, lab and small groups.

2 credit hours

CURRICULUM POLICY DEFINITIONS

Defines the department's curriculum policy...
  • Academic warning: a status used to identify students who are “at-risk” of course failure that requires the student to participate in an academic warning plan with the intent to improve performance. Academic warning may be removed at the end of the semester if performance improves and is not recorded on the student’s permanent academic file.
  • Academic probation: a status given to students who do not meet minimum academic requirements in any given term. Granted by the program upon recommendation by the PPP committee. Academic probation may be removed at the end of the semester if performance improves and all elements of the academic probation plan have been met. Academic probation is documented in the student’s academic file.
  • “At-risk” performance: student performance that indicates that the student is at risk for course or program failure. Operationalized as: the running average in two or more courses is less than 80 percent and/or four or more exam failures (<70 percent) in a single semester.
  • Deceleration: the loss of a student from an entering cohort, who remains matriculated in the PA program.
  • Dismissal: removal from the program such that reapplication and readmission is necessary for a student to return.
  • Non-passing final course grade: an assessment of “D” or “F” in a letter graded course/rotation.
  • Passing final course grade: an assessment of “C” or better in a letter graded course/rotation.
  • Passing examination grade: as defined on the individual course/rotation syllabus. May include: a grade of 70 percent or better on a student assessment/examination or an overall cohort average score and standard deviation from the mean.
  • Progression: advancement to the next semester of the program.
  • Promotion: advancement to the next phase of the program.
  • Progression, Promotion and Professionalism committee (PPP): chaired by the medical director, the program committee that applies program standards and procedures to each student’s overall academic and non-academic performance and takes action in accordance with this policy.
  • Remediation: the program’s defined and applied process for addressing deficiencies in a student’s knowledge and skills, such that the correction of these deficiencies is measurable and can be documented (ARC-PA).
  • Withdrawal: student-initiated process to leave the University before the end of the current semester or program of study.

BELOW IS A LIST OF THE CURRICULAR POLICIES

Grading Scale, Academic Standing, Required Academic Standards (Academic Warning and Academic Probation) Policy (in partial compliance of Standard A3.17a)

Addresses the program's specific grading scale, academic warning and academic probation...

Grading Scale

The official grading policy of the program is as follows:

A 90–100 percent

B 80–89.5 percent

C 70–79.5 percent

F Less than 69.5 percent

Final grades will be rounded (0.5 or greater). Example: 89.50 percent will be rounded to 90 percent; 89.49 percent will stay the same grade and not be rounded.

Clinical phase courses and rotations are graded as Pass/Fail.

Academic Standing

A student is considered to be in good standing if:

  • Student maintains both a semester average and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater.
  • Student has no final course/rotation grade of less than C or fail.

A student is considered to in good academic standing with probation if:

  • Student performance in the program has fallen below acceptable academic standards or who has exhibited unacceptable professional behavior defined by:
    • The semester cumulative GPA is less than 3.0.
    • Remediation of a course/rotation.
    • Failure of a clinical phase course or rotation.
    • Two or more final course grades of "C."
    • A score of less than 2 on any category of the didactic professionalism assessment (or a total score of 29 or below).

Academic Warning Policy

It is the policy of the program to utilize an academic warning "at-risk" system to early identify students who are struggling academically and assist them in identifying strategies to improve their academic skills as follows:

Phase

Didactic

Clinical

"At-risk" defined as

  • The running average in two or more courses is less than 80 percent.
  • Four or more exam failures (<70 percent) in a single semester.
  • A score of 2 or less on any category of the professionalism assessment
  • One rotation failure.
  • Poor mid-rotation evaluation by the preceptor as defined by any score of 2 or less.

Identified by

  • Faculty advisor notes the running averages and/or exam failures during regular faculty advising sessions.
  • Program notes the running averages and/or exam failures during regularly scheduled faculty meetings during which student progress is discussed.
  • Academic director will report on student progress during faculty meetings.
  • Clinical director will report on student progress during faculty meetings.
  • Faculty advisor monitoring student records.

Academic warning process

Once a student has been identified at-risk they will be notified by their faculty advisor (via email with attached academic warning form, CC’d to academic director) that they have been placed in the at-risk category and are on academic warning, they will be required to do the following*:

  • Meet at least twice per semester with their faculty advisor to review course performance, study skills and test taking skills. The faculty advisor may choose to refer the student to the Center for Testing and Learning for further academic evaluation if warranted. The faculty advisor will document these meetings using the Faculty Advisor Form.

And will be advised to do the following:

  • Utilize the Exam Master online software-a minimum of 25 questions per week and document usage by taking the practice exams. Material covered should correlate with those topics being taught in their current classes (Clinical Medicine, Physical Diagnosis, Pharmacotherapeutics, etc.). Student will use the "score" function so a score is given. If score is below 70 percent, the student will review missed questions and repeat the test until at least 70 percent is reached.
  • Students in the at-risk category who earn an exam grade less than 80 percent in any course will review their exams with the course director.
  • It is highly recommended that students hire a tutor in any course or courses in which they are struggling. It is possible that senior students may choose to serve in these roles, but will not be required to by the program.

Once a student has been identified at-risk they will be notified by their faculty advisor (via email with attached academic warning form, CC’d to clinical director) that they have been placed in the at-risk category and are on academic warning, they will be required to do the following*:

  • Meet with advisor and clinical director to create a plan for addressing poor mid-rotation evaluation.

And will be advised to do the following:

  • Utilize the Exam Master online software-a minimum of 25 questions per week and document usage by taking the practice exams. Material covered should correlate with the failed rotation area of practice. Student will use the "score" function so a score is given. If score is below 70 percent, the student will review missed questions and repeat the test until at least 70 percent is reached.

Progress/

outcomes

  • Academic warning is automatically removed at the end of the semester if the student completes the semester with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater.
  • Academic warning is NOT recorded on the permanent file. It is a process utilized to assist student’s success. It will not be noted on the chair’s letter at graduation.
  • Academic warning is automatically removed at the end of the semester if the student completes the semester by passing all courses/rotations.

  • Academic warning is NOT recorded on the permanent file. It is a process utilized to assist student’s success. It will not be noted on the chair’s letter at graduation.

*All academic warning demographics must be placed on the program remediation Excel spreadsheet by the course director.

*All academic warning demographics must be placed on the program remediation Excel spreadsheet by the course director.

Academic Probation

It is the policy of the program to utilize academic probation status as a means to identify students who have not met the program’s minimum academic requirements. PA students must have a minimum cumulative 3.0 GPA to graduate. Students who fall below a 3.0 semester GPA will be placed on academic probation and will have a semester probationary period in which to raise their grades to a cumulative 3.0 GPA. Students failing to do so will be referred to the Progression, Promotion and Professionalism committee. The committee may recommend an additional semester of probation, deceleration or dismissal.

Academic probation will be recommended by the PPP when:

  • The semester cumulative GPA is less than 3.0.
  • Remediation of a course the preceding semester.
  • Immediately upon failure of a clinical phase course/rotation.
  • Two or more final course grades of "C."
  • A score of 1 on any category of the didactic professionalism assessment (or a total score of 29 or below).

Identified by

  • The PPP committee reviews each student’s academic file during the end of semester progress meeting and notes the above on the progress form.
  • The PPP committee places the student on academic probation and notifies that student via email with attached academic probation form (in addition to semester progression form), CC'd to faculty advisor and program director.

Academic probation process

Once a student has been identified on academic probation, they will be required to do the following:

  • Meet weekly with their faculty advisor to review course performance, study skills and test taking skills. The faculty advisor may choose to refer the student to the Center for Testing and Learning for further academic evaluation if warranted. The faculty advisor will document these meetings using the Faculty Advisor Form (meetings may occur via phone, Skype or face-to-face).
  • Utilize the Exam Master online software-a minimum of 50 questions per week and document usage by taking the practice exams. Material covered should correlate with those topics being taught in their current classes (Clinical Medicine, Physical Diagnosis, Pharmacotherapeutics, etc.). Student will use the "score" function so a score is given. If score is below 70 percent, the student will review missed questions and repeat the test until at least 70 percent is reached.
  • Students on academic probation who earn an exam grade less than 80 percent in any course will review their exams with the course director.
  • It is highly recommended that student’s hire a tutor in any course or courses in which they are struggling. It is possible that senior students may choose to serve in these roles, but will not be required to by the program.

Progress/outcomes

  • Academic probation will be removed at the end of the semester if the student completes the semester with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater.
  • Academic probation due to failure of clinical phase course or rotation will not be removed until the rotations/courses have been successfully retaken.
  • Academic probation is recorded on the permanent file. It will be noted on the chair’s letter at graduation.
  • If the student continues to fail exams, earns less than a 3.0 cumulative semester GPA or remediates two courses, they will be referred to the PPP committee for consideration of escalating response.
  • Escalating responses may include deceleration or dismissal or continued academic probation.

*All academic probation demographics must be placed on the program remediation Excel spreadsheet by the PPP chair.

Curricular Completion Deadlines/Requirements Policy (in partial compliance of Standard A3.17b)

Addresses the program's completion deadline policy...

It is the program’s policy to follow the UT time limit for completion deadline.

  • A student is allowed seven years from the time graduate work has begun, whether at UT or elsewhere, in which to complete the degree. Under certain circumstances, the student, with approval from the respective program director, may revalidate, by examination, courses that are outdated by the time limit. See UT Catalog: Time Limit.
  • The PA program curriculum is a lockstep design. Students move through the curriculum as a cohort. During the didactic phase of study, each course must be successfully completed before beginning the next semester of study.
  • During the clinical phase:
    • If the student fails the following courses: PAM 624, 625, 710, 711, or 712, they will be required to retake the course the next semester or at the end of the clinical phase.
    • If the student fails PAM 800: they will be required to delay graduation and retake the course the next Spring.
    • If the student fails a rotation: they will be required to delay graduation and retake the rotation(s) the next Spring. The student will complete PAM 800- Graduation Seminar with their cohort, but will not be allowed to graduate until the failed rotations have been successfully retaken/completed.

Progression, Promotion and Completion (Graduation) Policy (in partial compliance of Standard A3.17c)

The program addresses the progression, promotion and graduation policies...

Progression

The Progression, Promotion and Professionalism (PPP) committee will determine progression from one semester to the next at the end of each semester based on meeting the following requirements:

  • The student has earned a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater.*
  • The student has earned a “C” or "Pass" or better in every course.**
  • The student has demonstrated adherence to the AAPA Code of Ethics and UT Student Conduct. requirements.***
  • The student has participated in all program required events (unless excused by the appropriate director).

The committee will meet at the end of each semester and review the student’s performance. The committee will complete the progression form and forward their recommendation to the program director.
The program director will make the final decision to allow the student to progress to the next semester.
*See academic probation policy: students may progress on academic probation if semester GPA is less than 3.0.
**See remediation policy: students may remediate up to two courses in total to earn a “C” during the didactic phase or two rotations in the clinical phase to earn a “pass.” (The maximum total didactic and clinical remediation/retake is three total in any combination of didactic/clinical).
***If applicable: the student has demonstrated adherence to the AAPA Code of Ethics and all University student conduct requirements by successfully completing any required professional or non-academic remediation plans.

Promotion

The Progression, Promotion and Professionalism (PPP) committee will determine promotion from one phase to the next at the end of each phase based on meeting the following requirements:

Didactic to Clinical Phase. The PPP committee will recommend promotion from the didactic phase of training to the clinical phase at the end of the didactic phase based on the following requirements:

  1. The student has earned a cumulative (didactic phase) GPA of 3.0 or greater with no course grade below a “C.”
  2. The student has demonstrated adherence to the AAPA Code of Ethics and UT Student Conduct requirements.*
  3. The student has participated in all program required events (unless otherwise excused by the appropriate director).
  4. The student has successfully passed the comprehensive didactic phase summative evaluation.
  5. The student has met all the qualifications for credentialing in the clinical phase to include all required immunizations, Tb skin test, passed urine drug screen, passed level 2 criminal background check, BLS, ACLS and PALS certification.
  6. The student has successfully completed the clinical orientation.

Clinical to Graduation Seminar Phase. The PPP committee will recommend promotion from the clinical phase of training to graduation seminar at the end of the clinical phase based on the following requirements:

  1. The student has passed each course/rotation.*
  2. The student has demonstrated adherence to the AAPA Code of Ethics and UT Student Conduct requirements.
  3. The student has participated in program required events (unless otherwise excused by the appropriate director).

*In the event that the student failed a rotation(s) they will be allowed to progress to PAM 800 (Graduation Seminar) but must return the next semester to retake the failed rotation(s) resulting in a delay in graduation. Maximum rotation retakes is set at two.

Graduation Seminar to Graduation. The PPP committee will recommend promotion from the graduation seminar to graduation based on the following requirements:

  1. The student has passed each course/rotation with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 and no course grade below “C.”
  2. The student has demonstrated adherence evaluated by the PPP committee to the AAPA Code of Ethics and UT PA Standards of Professional Conduct.
  3. The student has participated in all program required events (unless otherwise excused by the appropriate director).
  4. The student has passed the graduation seminar course with includes the senior summative experience.
  5. The student has met all UT graduation requirements.

Policies and Procedures for Processing Student Grievance (in partial compliance of Standard A3.17d)

Addresses the student grevience policy...
  • Students with an academic grievance should first discuss the grievance with the course director and submit a grade petition/academic grievance form within two business days of grade being posted.
  • Students who believe that an exam or course evaluation is unjust or inaccurate may submit a grade petition to the phase director (academic or clinical) who will review and respond. The petition must be made within two business days of response from the course director. The phase director must respond within two business days of receiving grievance form.
  • The student may choose to escalate the academic grievance to the program director within two business days of receiving phase director response who will review and respond within two business days.
  • The first decision to appeal the program’s academic grievance decision is with the College of Natural and Health Science Appeals Committee.

Policies and Procedures for Leave of Absence, Withdrawal and Dismissal (in partial compliance of Standard A3.17e)

Addresses the program's Leave of Absence, withdrawal and dismissal policy...

Withdrawal

Students are permitted to withdraw from the program at their discretion following the University-defined procedure. Unless a leave of absence is requested and granted, withdrawal from any individual course will not allow the student to progress in the program and therefore constitutes withdrawal from the program. The UT withdrawal policy can be found at: Withdrawal from the University.


Dismissal

  • Dismissal is an action recommended by Progression, Promotion and Professionalism committee to the program director when a student fails to adhere to the program’s academic or professional standards.
  • Dismissal is removal from the program such that reapplication and readmission is necessary for a student to return.
  • Dismissal appeal process: to appeal the program’s dismissal decision the student will contact the College of Natural and Health Sciences appeals committee. More information may be found at: Graduate Academic Appeals.
Professional examples which may lead to a dismissal recommendation include:
  1. Cheating
  2. Plagiarism
  3. Conviction of a felony
  4. Positive drug screen
  5. Refusal to submit to a drug screen
  6. Social media policy violation
  7. HIPAA violation.

Academic examples which may lead to a dismissal recommendation include:

  1. Remediation of more than two didactic courses
  2. Remediation/failure of more than two clinical rotations
  3. Rotation failure following two didactic remediation attempts
  4. Semester cumulative GPA less than 3.0
  5. Didactic phase cumulative GPA less than 3.0
  6. Unsuccessful remediation of any failed course or rotation
  7. While on academic probation, the student continues to fail exams, earns less than a 3.0 cumulative semester GPA or remediates two courses
  8. A score of “1” on any category of the professionalism assessment (or a total score of 29 or below).

Leave of Absence

  • At the discretion of the Progress/Promotion/Professionalism (PPP) Committee, deceleration may by allowed in the rare event that a student is granted a leave of absence. Students may request a leave of absence when personal (non-academic) circumstances arise, which jeopardize the likelihood for successful completion of their studies. Examples of personal (non-academic) circumstances include medical emergencies, military service or family obligations that impact the ability to progress unimpeded in the program of study. The conditions for return will be documented by the PPP Committee and may include repetition of completed semesters.
  • Per UT policy, a leave of absence for greater than two continuous semesters must follow procedures for re-admittance to the University.

Policies and Procedures for Remediation and Deceleration (in partial compliance of Standard A3.17f)

The program addresses the policies and procedures for remediation and deceleration...

Remediation

The goals of remediation are to:

  • To facilitate the student’s mastery of knowledge, skills and behavior in the areas in which they are determined to be deficient.
  • To assist the student in professional development.

Individual Examination/Skill Remediation

It is the policy of the program to provide a remediation process for individual examinations/skills/procedures in each phase of the curriculum as follows:

Phase

Didactic

Clinical

Summative

Trigger: exam or procedure failure

  • <70 percent on exam
  • Failure on procedure/skill
  • A score of 2 or less on any category of the professionalism assessment
  • <2 SD of concurrent national mean for PAEA EOR exam
  • 2 or less on any preceptor evaluation scored item
  • <2 SD of cohort mean on summative medical knowledge exam
  • Failure on procedure, skill or OSCE

Notified

Course director by email

CC: faculty advisor and academic director

Clinical director by email

CC: faculty advisor

Course director by email

CC: faculty advisor

Documented

Individual exam/procedure remediation form

Remediation Excel by course director

Individual exam/procedure

Remediation form

Remediation Excel by course director

Individual exam/procedure

Remediation form

Remediation Excel by course director

Plan

Meet with course director to review exam content. The course director may allow and/or require the student to complete additional assignments to become competent in the failed material on individual examinations but will not allow/require the student to retake the exam.

The original exam grade will stand for grading purposes.

Procedure-based assessment: students will be allowed to perform the procedure/skill up to three times and must meet the "proficient" level to successfully complete the course.

EOR: Students who score <2 SD of concurrent national mean of PAEA EOR exam will be required to retake the exam before a grade will be awarded for the course. The student will return to campus no later than the second Monday following completion of the failed exam to complete the retake exam.The student may only retake the exam one time to convert to a passing score.

Preceptor evaluation: All scores of less than 3 will be addressed with the student and advisor to determine the appropriate remediation.

Summative exam: students who score <2 SD of cohort mean on summative medical knowledge exam will be required to retake the exam before a grade will be awarded for the course. The student will retake the examination on the last day of the graduation seminar course.

The two exam scores will be averaged for grading purposes.

Procedure-based assessment: students will be allowed to perform the procedure/skill up to three times and must meet the "proficient" level to successfully complete the course.

OSCE: the student will be allowed one attempt to retake the failed OSCE after debrief and review of their initial performance. OSCEs are graded as pass/fail for summative experience.

Consequences

Successful completion of exam/procedure remediation results in unimpeded progression in the course.

Failure of the exam/procedure remediation will result in a referral to the PPP for a deceleration, dismissal or other recommendation.
Successful completion of preceptor evaluation remediation results in unimpeded progression in the clinical year.

In the event of EOR failure, the student will progress to the next clinical rotation but must retake the failed EOR- if successful in achieving a passing score then the student will continue to progress unimpeded.

Failure of the EOR exam/preceptor evaluation remediation will result in a rotation failure and referral to the PPP for a rotation repeat, deceleration, dismissal or other recommendation.
Successful completion of summative exam/OSCE remediation results in unimpeded progression in in the course.

Failure of the exam/procedure remediation will result in failure of the summative (graduation seminar) course. The course must be retaken the next semester, which will result in delayed graduation.

Recorded on permanent file

Chair’s letter

No

No

No

No

No

No

Course/Rotation Remediation

It is the policy of the program to provide a remediation process for courses in each phase of the curriculum as follows:

Phase

Didactic

(Includes didactic courses included in clinical phase)

Clinical

Summative

(Graduation Seminar course)

Trigger of failure for a course/rotation

  • End of course cumulative score <70%
  • A score of "1" on any category of the professionalism assessment (or a total score of 29 or below)

  • Failure of Rotation
  • Failure of PAM 624, 625, 710, 711,712

Failure of PAM 800

Notified

Course director by email

CC: advisor, academic director and PPP

Clinical director by email

CC: faculty advisor and PPP

Course director by email

CC: faculty advisor and PPP

Documented

Course failure remediation form

Remediation Excel by course director

Course failure remediation form

Remediation Excel by course director

Course failure remediation form

Remediation Excel by course director

Plan

Participate in remediation during final week of semester.

Remediation plan outlined by course director and approved by academic director.

Plan includes only material in which the student failed to meet competency.

May include cumulative exam or may require individual topic exam(s).

If the student fails the course remediation they will be referred to the PPP for deceleration or dismissal decision.

Delayed graduation and repeat rotation during the next Spring semester, which will result in additional tuition costs.

Remediation/retake of PAM 624, 625, 710, 711 & 712 will occur during the clinical phase. The remediation plan will be outlined by the course director and approved by the academic director.

If the student fails the rotation retake (remediation) they will be referred to the PPP for deceleration or dismissal decision.

(If the student fails that final rotation, they will proceed to graduation seminar but must return the following semester to retake the failed rotation resulting in a delayed graduation).

Each section of the senior summative is eligible for individual remediation as described in the individual remediation table.

If the student fails following individual section remediation attempts, they will fail the course, be referred to the PPP and must retake the course the next semester. This will result in delayed graduation and additional tuition costs.

If the student fails the course retake, they will be referred to the PPP and recommended for dismissal.

Permanent file

Chair’s letter

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Maximum remediation

A student may remediate a maximum of two courses during the didactic phase without deceleration.

Failure of a third course would trigger a referral to the PPP for a deceleration and/or dismissal recommendation.

A student may remediate a maximum of two rotations.

Failure of a third rotation would trigger a referral to the PPP for a deceleration and/or dismissal recommendation

If the student has remediated two didactic phase courses, the first clinical rotation phase remediation will trigger referral to the PPP for a deceleration and/or dismissal recommendation.

Course remediation is not an option.

Final outcome

Academic probation

Any course remediation automatically triggers the student to be on academic probation for the following semester.

One course failure coupled with continued marginal performance as defined by the "at-risk" policy will trigger a referral to the PPP for further recommendations including possible deceleration and/or dismissal.

Any rotation remediation automatically triggers student to be on academic probation for the following two rotations.

One rotation failure coupled with a poor mid-rotation evaluation by the preceptor on the subsequent rotation will trigger a referral to the PPP further recommendations including possible deceleration and/or dismissal.

If the student fails following individual section remediation attempts, they will fail the course, be referred to the PPP and must retake the course the next semester. This will result in delayed graduation and additional tuition costs.

If the student fails the course retake, they will be referred to the PPP and recommended for dismissal.

Policies and Procedures for Processing Allegations for Harassment (in partial compliance of Standard A3.17g)

Addresses the policies for processing allegations for harrassment...
  • The University of Tampa is committed to providing a safe and welcoming environment for all students, faculty and staff. Sexual misconduct and relationship violence is in direct conflict with UT’s stated educational mission. Sexual misconduct and relationship violence is unwanted conduct of a sexual nature that includes sexual harassment, gender harassment, nonconsensual sexual contact, nonconsensual sexual intercourse, sexual exploitation, intimate partner violence (including domestic violence and dating violence) and stalking. These procedures, which are prompt, fair and impartial, will be used in reporting, investigating, adjudicating and determining sanctions for sexual misconduct and relationship violence complaints.
  • These procedures apply to sexual misconduct and relationship violence (part XIX, listed under University Policies). For more information see: Title IX and Sexual Misconduct Procedures.
  • These policies apply to all UT students, including PA students. For a complete description of the university response and procedure upon notice of alleged sexual misconduct and/or relationship violence see: Title IX and Sexual Misconduct Procedures and click on the tab marked “University Response Procedures.”

Decision Flow Charts

Addresses the academic warning and probation decisions by the program...
Coming soon.