If Donors Raise $3,000, Senior Shaves Her Head

Published: Mar 14, 2013
Mackenzie Crowley ’13 said if her UT Sociology Club can raise $3,000 by the start of UT’s Relay for Life on April 12, she’ll shave her curly locks.
Mackenzie Crowley ’13 said if her UT Sociology Club can raise $3,000 by the start of UT’s Relay for Life on April 12, she’ll shave her curly locks.
Mackenzie Crowley ’13 said if her UT Sociology Club can raise $3,000 by the start of UT’s Relay for Life on April 12, she’ll shave her curly locks.

“I like to break social norms just to see how people react,” said Crowley, a sociology major from New York. “It’s actually been on my bucket list to shave my head.”

At 6 feet 1 inch tall, Crowley has always drawn looks, so she doesn’t fear being gawked at.

Referring to her stature, she said, “I’ve never been normal, so I might as well have fun with it.”

This is the first year Crowley is president of the sociology club, the first year she is a Relay for Life team captain and the first time she’s ever participated in the signature fundraising event of the American Cancer Society.

Last year, UT’s event raised more than $75,000, making it one of the top college Relay events in the U.S. Relays are held throughout the year across America and in countries all over the world, with proceeds going toward cancer research and outpatient care.

During the 18-hour event, participants camp out at the site, typically a track or intramural field. At least one person from each team must be walking at all times. Crowley plans to shave her head at the event.

“I’ve always had a love/hate relationship with my hair,” said Crowley of her curly, lively top. Previously a model who once sported a Mohawk for a fashion show, she’s been affectionately known as the girl with an afro.

Crowley’s team has raised about $330 toward its $3,000 goal. She said the club’s overall goal this year is to focus more on applied sociology, incorporating service into its gatherings. When the idea to participate in Relay presented itself, she took it. Plus, cancer fits with her interest in breaking social norms.

“Cancer doesn’t discriminate,” Crowley said, “and as a sociologist, that boggles my mind.”

Visit the sociology club’s Relay Web page.