Browser warning

Feb. 22 UT Honors Symposium to Explore Captive Nation: Black Prison Organizing in the Civil Rights Era

Published: February 13, 2018
Vaughn2_THUMB
Dan Berger, who is an associate professor of comparative ethnic studies and U.S. history at The University of Washington Bothell, will discuss "Captive Nation: Black Prison Organizing in the Civil Rights Era."

On Thursday, Feb. 22, Dan Berger, who is an associate professor of comparative ethnic studies and U.S. history at The University of Washington Bothell, will discuss "Captive Nation: Black Prison Organizing in the Civil Rights Era" as part of The University of Tampa's Honors Program symposia series. Berger's talk will begin at 4 p.m. in Reeves Theatre, located on the second floor of the Vaughn Center, and is free and open to the public.

Berger is the author or editor of six books, including Captive Nation: Black Prison Organizing in the Civil Rights Era, which won the 2015 James A. Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians. Captive Nation documents the central role prisons played within the black freedom struggle between 1955 and 1980. He recently published an op-ed in The Washington Post's "Made by History" blog about Florida prisons.

Other published books by Berger include Rethinking the American Prison Movement, The Struggle Within: Prisons, Political Prisoners and Mass Movements in the United Sates and Outlaws of America: The Weather Underground and the Politics of Solidarity. Berger was the editor of The Hidden 1970s: Histories of Radicalism and Letters from Young Activists: Today's Rebels Speak Out.

Berger is a faculty associate of the Harry Bridges Center for Labor Studies at the University of Washington, and he sits on the advisory or editorial board of the journals Abolition, Journal of Civil and Human Rights and The Sixties.

For more information about the event, contact Ryan Cragun, director of the Honors Program and associate professor of sociology, at rcragun@ut.edu, or Kacy Tillman, associate director of the Honors Program and associate professor of English, at ktillman@ut.edu.