New Commander Leads Spartan Battalion

Published: Sep 1, 2005

Lt. Col. Patrick M. O’Sullivan, a former Army intelligence officer, has succeeded Lt. Col. Deirdre Dixon as Spartan Battalion commander, professor of military science and director of ROTC. O’Sullivan reported to campus in August to take command immediately upon Dixon’s retirement

A native of Milford, CT, O’Sullivan, 44, grew up in Hollywood and Winter Haven, FL. In 1980, he enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army, and spent two years as an intelligence analyst with VII Corps in Stuttgart, Germany.

He was awarded an Army ROTC Scholarship in 1982, which curtailed his enlistment and returned him to college. He graduated magna cum laude in 1985 from Florida Southern College in Lakeland, where he also was named Distinguished Military Graduate. His degree is a BS in political science.

International Experience

After college, O’Sullivan was an honor graduate of the Military Intelligence Officers’ Basic Course, Fort Huachuca, AZ, and a graduate of Airborne School, Fort Benning, GA. He assumed duties as Battalion Intelligence Officer (S2) of the 5th Battalion (Mechanized), 8th Infantry Regiment in Mainz, Germany, in January 1986. After two years, he became assistant S2 of the 1st Brigade, 8th Infantry Division (Mechanized) in Mainz in January 1988.

Upon completion of his tour of Germany in May 1989, O’Sullivan graduated from an abbreviated military intelligence officers’ advanced course at Fort Huachuca and the year-long post-graduate intelligence program at the Defense Intelligence College (Defense Intelligence Agency) in Washington, DC.

O’Sullivan then served as an imagery intelligence systems and plans officer with the Defense Intelligence Agency and Central Imagery Office in Washington from 1990 to 1993. His service included temporary deployment to Saudi Arabia for Operation Desert Shield and crisis cell work in the National Military Joint Intelligence Center at the Pentagon during Operation Desert Storm.

After graduating from the Combined Arms and Services Staff School, Fort Leavenworth, KS, O’Sullivan assumed command of B Company, 344th Military Intelligence Battalion, at Goodfellow AFB, TX, in July 1993. After company command, he then served as the Battalion Operations Officer (S3) of the 344th Military Intelligence Battalion from July 1994 to July 1995.

O’Sullivan spent 1995 to 1997 engaged in European foreign area officer training. He graduated from Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, CA, with a Master of Arts in National Security Affairs. He then spent a year conducting in-country training in Europe, based out of the U.S. Embassy in Bonn, Germany.

Upon graduation from the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth in 1998, O’Sullivan returned to Fort Huachuca, where he was assigned to the U.S. Army Intelligence Center. He served as an operations officer in the Battle Command Battle Lab, Battalion Executive Officer of the 304th Military Intelligence Battalion from 1999 to 2000, and senior instructor of the 304th Military Intelligence Battalion.

From 2000 to 2002, O’Sullivan served in the International Army Programs Directorate, Headquarters U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, Fort Monroe, VA, where he was responsible for U.S. Army bilateral relations with the armies of France and Italy.

In August 2002, O’Sullivan was assigned as the professor of military science and head of the ROTC Department at Minnesota State University in Mankato.

O’Sullivan’s awards and decorations include the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Army Meritorious Service Medal (with three oak leaf clusters), Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal (with oak leaf cluster), Army Achievement Medal (with three oak leaf clusters) and Joint Meritorious Unit Award.

He is married to the former Elisabeth Orshansky of Alexandria, VA. O’Sullivan lists as his hobbies sports, reading, movies, travel, cats and spending as much time as possible with his wife.

For more information, contact the Office of Public Information at publicinfo@ut.edu or (813) 253-6232.